Kettlewell (St. Mary)

KETTLEWELL (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 15 miles (N.) from Skipton; containing, with Starbotton township, 685 inhabitants. This place suffered great devastation in 1686 from a flood, during which one of the neighbouring hills opened, and poured forth a deluge of water and gravel, which nearly destroyed the village of Starbotton. The parish comprises by computation 7320 acres, of which 2520 are in Starbotton: the surface is mountainous, and the scenery romantic; the soil is in general rich, the parish consisting, with the exception of some moors, of fine pasture and meadow land. Coal of moderate quality is abundant on the mountains, and lead-ore is found, for which smeltingworks are in operation. The town is situated on the banks of the river Wharfe, in a deep and luxuriant valley, between the mountains of Great Whernside and Middlesmoor; and is irregularly built. The market, which is well supplied with corn, is on Thursday; a statutefair is held on July 6th, and there are fairs, chiefly for cattle, on the 2nd of Sept. and 23rd of October. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the gift of the Misses Bolland; net income, £120. The church is a neat structure with a tower, built in 1820, at a cost of about £1400, raised by a rate, aided by £100 from the Church Building Society; it contains 600 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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