Kessingland (St. Edmund)

KESSINGLAND (St. Edmund), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (N. E.) from Wangford; containing 658 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from London to Yarmouth, and bounded on the east by the sea, comprises by measurement 1678 acres. A signal-station has been erected, and the lofty tower of the church forms a good landmark to vessels navigating this part of the coast. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich: the tithes have been commuted for £405, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church, originally a spacious structure, of which the chancel and south aisle have been taken down, consists of the old tower, and the remaining portions, which latter were rebuilt in 1694. The parsonage-house, a handsome building, was lately erected by the Rev. D. G. Norris. In an area called the Nunnery Yard, near the parsonage, are some ruins of buildings; but there is no record of any religious house. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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