Kelsey, South

KELSEY, SOUTH, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5¾ miles (W. by S.) from Caistor; consisting of the united parishes of St. Mary and St. Nicholas, and containing 622 inhabitants. This district, which is situated on the river Ancholme, comprises by computation 5000 acres; the soil is generally a dark clay, with some portions of a light black mould near the river. The surface is level, and was subject to frequent inundations prior to the improvement of the Ancholme by widening and deepening its channel, under an act of parliament; the draining of the lands has also been promoted by the construction of a canal, which passes for nearly four miles through the parish, and communicates with the river. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 15., in the alternate patronage of the Crown, and G. Skipwith, Esq., with a net income of £687: the glebe comprises 100 acres. The church of St. Nicholas is a modern edifice, attached to the ancient tower; that of St. Mary has gone to ruin. Here was a priory, a cell to the abbey of Seize, in Normandy; but there are no remains.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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