Ingham (Holy Trinity)

INGHAM (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Happing, E. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (E. N. E.) from Stalham; containing 509 inhabitants. A large stock fair is held on Trinity-Monday. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Bishop of Norwich: the tithes have been commuted for £456. The church is principally in the decorated style, with a lofty and very handsome embattled tower; it has a Norman font, and a groined porch on the south. On the south side of the chancel were stone stalls with canopies for four priests, one of which still remains, and on each side of the chancel are ten oak stalls; there are also several ancient tombs with effigies, including those of Sir Miles Stapleton and lady, and Sir Roger de Boys and lady. Annexed to the church was a college or priory of the order of the Holy Trinity, for the redemption of captives, founded in 1360, by Sir Miles Stapleton, of Bedale, in Yorkshire, who had become lord of this place by marriage with Joanna, daughter and sole heiress of Sir Oliver de Ingham, a valiant knight, and favourite of Edward III. Sir Miles rebuilt the church, and ordained that the college should be for a prior, sacrist, and six canons. The revenue, at the Dissolution, was estimated at £74. 2. 7.; and the site of the priory, with the impropriate rectory, and some appurtenances, came to the Bishopric of Norwich, in exchange for other estates. The chancel was used as the conventual church, and the priory, of which there are some slight remains, was situated on the north side of the church. There is a place of worship for Baptists. At the inclosure, in 1812, about seventeen acres and a half were allotted to the poor.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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