Ince, or Ince-in-Makerfield

INCE, or Ince-in-Makerfield, a township, in the parish and union of Wigan, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, l½ mile (E. S. E.) from Wigan, on the road to Bolton and Manchester; containing 2565 inhabitants. The family of Ince were anciently lords of this manor, which, in the reign of Henry IV., was conveyed by their heiress to the Gerards. It remained the property of the latter family for several centuries, and was sold by William Gerard, Esq., to the late Earl of Balcarres. The township comprises 2221 acres, whereof 212 are arable, 1692 pasture, and 317 common, waste, &c.; the surface is level, the soil various, mostly a stiff clay, and the entire substratum excellent cannel and other coal, with about fifteen collieries at work, varying generally from 40 to 300 yards deep, and one of them 600 yards in depth. At a short distance from the Ince road, was discovered lately, by Mr. McCormick, a contractor of the Liverpool and Bury railway, a valuable stone-quarry, of singular strata, a great quantity of the material of which was used in the construction of the bridges upon that part of the line for which he contracted. There is a cotton-mill in operation. The Leeds and Liverpool canal, and the North-Union and the Liverpool and Bury railways, run through the township. William Gerard Walmsley, Esq., of Platts, possesses 400 acres of the land: John Walmsley, Esq., of Bath, is owner of the manorial Hall, and 440 acres; and Colonel Anderton, owner of Ince Hall, with 360 acres. The tithes have been commuted for £117. 11. 11. payable to an impropriator, and £33. 17. 3. to the rector.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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