Ince (St. James)

INCE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Chester; containing 475 inhabitants. This place was distinguished for a monastic institution that belonged to the abbots of St. Werburgh's, Chester. The dormitory, refectory, and chapel still remain; the two former have been converted into a farmhouse, and the chapel into a barn, an object of great beauty, the eastern side being thickly covered with ivy. The walls are about six feet in thickness, with eight large bay windows, now bricked up; and the monastery was surrounded by a moat, still traceable by parts of its outer walls. The parish comprises by measurement 1500 acres, and is bounded on the north by the river Mersey, where a pier has been constructed, at the distance of half a mile from the village. The central portion is rising ground, and each extremity consists of marsh land protected by an embankment from the tides of the Mersey, which flow up two small brooks forming the eastern and western boundaries of the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £104; patron and impropriator, the representative of the late Edmund Yates, Esq.: the glebe consists of about an acre and a half of land, on which is the glebe-house. The church, situated on the highest point of a rock, has some traces in the Norman style, but the greater part of the building is of later date. The late Mr. Yates erected a free school for children.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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