Hutton-Rudby

HUTTON-RUDBY, a township, in the parish of Rudby-in-Cleveland, union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Stokesley; containing 911 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book written Hotun, was the property of Gospatrick, Earl of Northumberland, but on the rebellion of that noble was bestowed by the Conqueror upon the Earl of Morton: it afterwards passed to the Meinells, who, in the time of Edward I., held the estate under the Archbishop of Canterbury by military service; and among subsequent owners, mention occurs of the families of D'Arcy and Conyers. The manor was once of considerable importance, and attached to it was a soke or liberty extending over several adjacent places. The township comprises 2184a. 24p., of which 1213 acres are arable, 681 meadow, 29 wood, and 30 in roads, exclusive of 229 acres exempt by prescription from the payment of tithes. The village, which is large, is pleasantly situated on the southern acclivities of the dale of the Leven, and a bridge over the river affords means of communication with Rudby: many of the inhabitants are employed in various branches of the linen manufacture. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. A free school, founded in 1740, has an endowment.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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