Hutton-Cranswick (St. Peter)

HUTTON-CRANSWICK (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Driffield, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; consisting of the townships of Hutton-Cranswick, Rotsea, and Sunderlandwick; and containing 1228 inhabitants, of whom 1154 are in the township of Hutton-Cranswick, 3½ miles (S.) from Driffield. This place is thought to have been more considerable than it is at present, and there are four or five mansions the moats around which still remain; the neighbourhood was the arena of fierce engagements between the Saxons and Danes, and traces of a fortified camp exist at Hutton. The parish comprises by computation 6230 acres, of which 4710 are in the township. It is bounded on the east by the navigable river Hull, on which are extensive flour-mills, and by which the produce is shipped to the Humber; the surface is boldly undulated, and the higher grounds command views over the Wolds and of Holderness. The villages of Hutton and Cranswick are within half a mile of each other, the former on an eminence, and the latter in a vale, and are neatly built and well inhabited. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 8. 6½.; net income, £130, with a house; patron, Lord Hotham. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1769. The church, supposed to have been built in the reign of Henry III., is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower, and contains an ancient Norman font ornamented with sculpture. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z