Hundersfield

HUNDERSFIELD, a division, in the parish of Rochdale, partly in the union of Todmorden, but chiefly in that of Rochdale, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire; comprising the four townships of Blatchinworth with Calderbrook, Todmorden with Walsden, Wardleworth, and Wuerdle with Wardle; and containing 30,042 inhabitants. The original name of the division, according to Dr. Whitaker, was Honorsfield, from Honorius, a Saxon chief; but it is equally probable, from many of the belligerent appellations in this part of the parish, such as War-dell, War-land, Redditch, &c., that in early times the place was the scene of some memorable victory, and was hence called the "Field of Honour," or Honorsfield. Mention of Michael de Hunrisfield, son of Suard, lord of Hunrisfield, occurs in a deed without date, but fixed by collateral circumstances in the reign of Stephen. This extensive lordship was afterwards in possession of an ancient family named Stubley, who occupied Stubley Hall. The division is seven miles and three-quarters in length and five miles in breadth, and forming the eastern portion of the parish, is skirted on the Yorkshire side by the lofty ridges of Blackstone-Edge, Walsden-Edge, and Stony-Edge. While the ancient part of Rochdale is comprehended within the divisions of Castleton and Butterworth, the more modern and handsome part of the town extends itself into Hundersfield, of which it forms the southwest extremity. There are numerous places of worship, which are noticed in the articles on Rochdale and the townships comprehended in the division.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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