Hulme

HULME, a chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire; containing 50,886 inhabitants. It is separated from the city of Manchester by the river Medlock; the Irwell flows on the west, and the Duke of Bridgewater's canal passes through. The area comprises 440 acres of land. There are several cotton-mills, employing a large number of hands; and here are situated a depôt in connexion with the Manchester gas-works; and the Cavalry Barracks, built prior to the year 1804, and which will accommodate 500 men. An act was passed in 1834 for the regulation and improvement of the township. It is within the parliamentary and corporate borough of Manchester, and is divided into two wards. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £300; the patronage and appropriation belong to the Dean and Canons of the Cathedral of Manchester. The chapel, dedicated to St. George, a handsome edifice in the later English style, with a tower 135 feet high, was built in 1828, at an expense, including furnishing &c., of £15,000, provided by grant from the Church Commissioners. The interior is elegantly arranged, and has a grand and imposing effect; the roof is elaborately groined, and enriched with bosses and flowers, and the altar highly decorated, having above it three stainedglass windows, recently inserted at an expense of £280. Hulme also contains a church called the Holy Trinity; and in 1846, a district named St. Mark's was formed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, the living of which is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and other denominations of dissenters; and numerous daily, Sunday, and infant schools. Among the public institutions are, the workhouse for the Chorlton union; and an asylum for female penitents, for which the present edifice was built in 1837. Sculptured stones of early date have been discovered in the chapelry.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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