Hughley (St. John the Baptist)

HUGHLEY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Atcham, liberty of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Wenlock; containing 127 inhabitants. It derived its name from Hugh de Lea, proprietor of the manor in the twelfth century, and ancestor of the Leas of Langley and Lea Hall. In the reign of Richard II., a special commission was issued to inquire into the best method of protecting travellers and the surrounding country against the lawless depredations of the banditti, who infested the extensive woods of Hughley. The parish comprises by computation 1110 acres, of which the soil is a poor clay; coal-mines are supposed to have been formerly worked, and there are quarries of excellent limestone. The road from Wenlock to Church-Stretton runs near the south-eastern boundary. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 11. 3., and in the gift of the Earl of Bradford: the tithes have been commuted for £73, and the glebe contains about 90 acres, of which 50 are in the parish of Stottesden, and 40 in the parishes of Hughley, Kenley, and Church-Preen; the glebe-house was erected in 1827. The church is a neat edifice, and is supposed to have been originally very handsome: the nave is separated from the chancel by a carved oak screen; there is a small tower with four bells. The edifice was repaired and repewed in 1842, by donations from the patron, rector, the London and the Hereford Societies for building and repairing churches, and by a rate.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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