Huggate (St. Mary)

HUGGATE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 7½ miles (N. E.) from Pocklington; containing 462 inhabitants. This parish is situated in the Wolds, and comprises by measurement 7000 acres, of which nearly the whole is good arable land in a high state of cultivation. Its surface is generally undulated, and interspersed with deep dales; the soil is a chalky loam, resting on a bed of chalk, occasionally mixed with flint. The village, standing on an abrupt acclivity of the Wolds, consists of numerous scattered houses; the inhabitants are supplied with water from a well 348 feet in depth. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted partly for a money payment, and partly for land; net income, £449. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the Norman style, with portions of a later date, and an embattled tower surmounted by a lofty octagonal spire; it is supposed to have been built by Ralph de Paganel, about the year 1233. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Traces exist of two ancient roads intersecting the parish, and connecting two distant Roman stations; and there are numerous British intrenchments, with tumuli, and other relics of antiquity.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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