Hudswell

HUDSWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 1¾ mile (W. S. W.) from Richmond; containing 258 inhabitants. This township is situated on the banks of the Swale, and comprises 1239 acres, whereof 130 are common or waste. Its scenery is enriched with wooded acclivities, interspersed with rocky ridges of limestone; and the river, winding along the valley to which it gives name, imparts a lively and pleasing aspect: the higher grounds command some diversified prospects, and the view from the churchyard is one of the finest in the district of Richmondshire. The soil is generally clayey, and a considerable portion of the chapelry is moorland. The village is on the road leading to Reeth and Leyburn, and at no great distance from the river. The chapel contains a piscina, apparently of great antiquity; the number of sittings is 100. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Catterick; net income, £80. A national school is supported by subscription, and by the proceeds of an allotment of waste on the inclosure of the moors, amounting to £16 per annum. On the lands of Hudswell-Grange, about half a mile to the south of the village, is a mineral spring, the water of which is impregnated with sulphur and magnesia.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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