Howgill

HOWGILL, a chapelry, in the parish of Sedbergh, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Sedbergh. This district, comprising the hamlets of Howgill and Bland, is situated between the Howgill Fells, the height of which is 2320 feet, and the river Lune, which separates it from Firbank, in Westmorland. The scenery is mountainous and wild. The North-Western railway passes through. A chapel was built here by Mr. John Robinson, an inhabitant, in 1685, and was rebuilt on a new site, and a burial-ground attached to it, in 1838, at an expense of £570, raised by voluntary subscription, towards which the Incorporated Society contributed £50, and Trinity College, Cambridge, £30; it is a neat building in the early English style. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Sedbergh, and has an income of £80. A school was built and endowed by Mr. Robinson, the master of which has a salary of about £40, including the school fees; and Mr. Robinson also bequeathed £100, of which he appropriated the interest to be divided amongst the poor.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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