Hovingham (All Saints)

HOVINGHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Malton; comprising the township of Scackleton, in the wapentake of Bulmer, and the townships of Aryholme with Howthorpe, Coulton, Fryton, South Holme, Hovingham, East Ness, and Wath, in that of Ryedale, N. riding of York; the whole containing 1277 inhabitants, of whom 681 are in the township of Hovingham, 9 miles (W. N. W.) from Malton. The parish comprises by computation 8000 acres, of which the surface is hilly, and the high grounds command extensive and richly varied prospects reaching along the vale of Ryedale, and terminating to the east in the hills near Scarborough; the lands are chiefly the property of the Earl of Carlisle and Sir Wm. Worsley, Bart. The village is beautifully situated, and the scenery around it richly wooded. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £97; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Carlisle. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school was endowed with £20 per annum by Mrs. Arthington in 1716, and £200 from the Rev. James Graves in 1804. In a field about one mile from the village are three springs of sulphureous, chalybeate, and clear water, respectively; the medicinal properties of the first have attracted many visiters. In 1745, a Roman hypocaust and bath, with a piece of tessellated pavement, were discovered, and near the bath some coins from Antoninus Pius to Constantine. On the side of an adjoining hill is a breastwork, supposed to be Roman.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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