Houghton

HOUGHTON, a parish, in the union of East-Retford, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Tuxford; containing 77 inhabitants. This place, anciently Hoctone or Hoctune, was the fee of Baldric the Saxon, before the Conquest, and afterwards of Roger de Poictou, from whose family it passed to the Earl of Lancaster, and next to Thomas de Longvillers, in whose house it continued for some successions. It subsequently passed to other families; and came to Sir William Holles or Hollis, whose great-grandson, John Holles, was in 1624 created Baron Houghton and Earl of Clare, which titles are now merged in the dukedom of Newcastle. The first duke of Newcastle had a splendid mansion here, but scarcely a vestige of it is remaining. The parish comprises 994a. 1r. 15p.; the surface is low, the soil of a sandy quality, and in some parts poor, but advancing towards a higher state of cultivation. The scenery is picturesque; a small stream, passing on the north and west, runs into the river Idle. There are still some ruins of the ancient church embosomed in a plantation of firs, consisting of part of the nave, with the northern portion of the cemetery, in which are mutilated tombs with the armorial bearings of the Stanhope and Holles families. The inhabitants attend divine service in the neighbouring church of Walesby. At Houghton Park is a national school, partly supported by an endowment of £25 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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