Horsforth

HORSFORTH, a chapelry, in the parish of Guisley, Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 5 miles (N. W.) from Leeds; containing 4188 inhabitants. This place, in the Domesday survey Horseford, formed part of the revenue of Kirkstall Abbey, after the dissolution of which establishment, the manor was granted to the Cranmer family, who sold it to Lord Clinton, from whom it was purchased by four of the freeholders. The chapelry is bounded on the south by the river Aire, and comprises by measurement 2729 acres of fertile land, of which 430 are arable, 1700 pasture, 100 wood, and 12 common; the surface is boldly varied. The village is pleasantly seated on the acclivities of the vale of Aire, and its inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of woollen-cloths: on two tributaries of the river are two paper-mills, two scribblingmills, and one silk-mill. There are three tanneries; also some extensive quarries of sandstone, from one of which was raised a block containing 225 cubic feet, for the London and Birmingham railway. The chapel was rebuilt in 1758, at a cost of £1020, chiefly defrayed by the Stanhope family, and is a neat edifice containing 460 sittings: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £158, patron, Mr. Stanhope. A new ecclesiastical district has been constituted, called Woodside; it is partly within the chapelry of Horsforth, and the living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately. A rent-charge of £121. 16. has been awarded as a commutation of tithes. There are places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Methodists of the New Connexion.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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