Horkstow (St. Maurice)

HORKSTOW (St. Maurice), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Barton-upon-Humber; containing 228 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the river Ancholme, which is here navigable, and crossed by a handsome suspension-bridge, built by Adam Smith. It comprises by measurement 2020 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture, with some grounds thickly wooded with old timber; on the higher lands is a light, and on the lower a heavy loamy soil: an inferior kind of chalk-stone is quarried for the roads. The village is beautifully situated under a hill, by which it is sheltered on the east and north-east; and the surrounding scenery is richly wooded. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 4., and in the gift of the Earl of Yarborough, whose great tithes have been commuted for £228, and the vicarial tithes for £255. The church is a very ancient structure, with a square tower, and contains a family vault for the Darells, formerly owners of property in the parish, and a monument to Admiral Shirley. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A commandery of Knights Hospitallers of the order of St. John of Jerusalem, existed here; and in 1796, fragments of three tessellated pavements were discovered near Horkstow Hall, the largest of which is divided into three compartments, one of them exhibiting a curious representation of a chariot race. Roman coins have also been found.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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