Horbury

HORBURY, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Wakefield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Wakefield, on the road to Huddersfield; containing 2683 inhabitants. This place is of ancient date, having been known previous to the Domesday survey. The chapelry comprises by measurement 1162 acres, of arable and pasture land in nearly equal portions; and includes the greater part of the village of Horbury-Bridge, where are several extensive coal-wharfs. Many of the inhabitants are engaged in the spinning of yarn and manufacture of cloth. The Calder and Hebble navigation, which has been much improved, affords facility of conveyance; and the Manchester and Leeds railway has a station here. The living is a perpetual curacy: net income, £225; patron, the Vicar of Wakefield. The present chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, is a handsome edifice in the Grecian style, erected in 1791, by Mr. J. Carr, architect, a native of this place, and alderman of York, at an expense of £8000, defrayed by himself. There are places of worship for dissenters. A school for boys is endowed with £30 per annum, from the town lands and other sources.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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