Hooton-Roberts (St. John the Baptist)

HOOTON-ROBERTS (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Rotherham, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (N. E.) from Rotherham; containing 175 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1036a. 1r. 11p., of which 34 acres are woodland, and of the remainder, two-thirds arable and one-third pasture. Its substratum abounds with limestone and freestone; and from the quarries of the latter, the stone was raised for the erection of Wentworth House, Thribergh House, and Rose Hill. Thomas, Earl of Strafford, who was beheaded in the reign of Charles I., had a seat here, in which his countess resided for several years after his death. The village is situated on the road from Rotherham to Doncaster, and the surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 8.; patron, Earl Fitzwilliam: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £255, and the glebe comprises 59 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a tower, and has an enriched Norman arch.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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