Hooton-Pagnell (All Saints)

HOOTON-PAGNELL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York; containing 423 inhabitants, of whom 348 are in the township, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Doncaster. This parish derives the latter part of its name from Ralph de Paganel, to whom the manor belonged at the time of the Conquest: it consists of the three constablewicks of Hooton and Moorhouse, Bilham, and Stotfold, which, as well as Frickley with Clayton, are included in the manor of Hooton. The parish comprises nearly 3000 acres, of which the surface is varied, and the scenery picturesque, embracing extensive views. The manor, and the chief part of the township of Hooton, belong to St. Andrew Warde, Esq. The manor-house is very ancient, but by whom, or at what period built, is not known; nor can it be clearly ascertained how long the manor continued in the family of Paganel: it appears, however, that it afterwards belonged successively to an Earl of Southampton, to a Giffard Lutterel, to Sir Richard Hutton, and lastly to Colonel Bierley, of whom it was purchased by the great-grandfather of the present proprietor. The mansion is beautifully situated, embosomed in fine plantations; there is a curious ancient gateway and porter's lodge. The village has an old cross in good preservation. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 2½.; net income, £247; patrons, the Governors of Wakefield School. The church, which belonged to a religious house at York, is an ancient structure with a tower.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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