Honley

HONLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Huddersfield; containing 5383 inhabitants. This chapelry, which is beautifully situated in the picturesque vale of the Holme, comprises 2441a. 2r. 12p., chiefly the property of the Earl of Dartmouth, who is lord of the manor; the surface is undulated, the higher grounds command extensive and diversified views, and the scenery is in many parts picturesque, and embellished with wood. The village stands close to the river, and on the western acclivities of the vale, reaching to their summit. The inhabitants are principally employed in the manufacture of woollen and fancy cloths, for which there are several factories on the banks of the river. Excellent stone for roads and buildings is procured in abundance at Scott Gate Head quarry; and coal of inferior quality is obtained in large quantities. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was rebuilt by subscription, in 1842-3, in the early English style, and consists of a nave and aisles, with a tower at the west end. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £180; patron, the Vicar of Almondbury. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, Methodists of the New Connexion, and Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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