Holme-Upon-Spalding-Moor (All Saints)

HOLME-UPON-SPALDING-MOOR (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Howden, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Market-Weighton; containing 1509 inhabitants. This parish, which is skirted on the west and south by the river Foulness, comprises about 12,000 acres, whereof 1000 are woodland and plantations, 1000 rabbit warren, and the remainder arable and pasture. The surface, with the exception of an isolated eminence, on which are the remains of the ancient beacon from which this division of the wapentake has its name, is generally flat; the soil is chiefly of a light and sandy quality, and a considerable portion of the lands is still uninclosed. Holme Hall, the seat of the Hon. Philip Stourton, is a spacious and handsome mansion of brick, situated in a demesne embellished with plantations. The village is on the road from Market-Weighton to Howden and Selby; and the Market-Weighton canal, which passes through the parish at a place called River Head, where it receives the water of the river Foulness, affords a facility of conveyance for lime, coal, bricks, and tiles, from the Humber, for the supply of the district. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £97, with a good house; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge. The rectorial tithes were commuted at the inclosure, in 1775, for upwards of 1200 acres of land; and there are 53 acres of vicarial glebe. The church, situated on the Beacon Hill, and commanding a fine prospect, is partly in the later English style, of which the tower is a handsome specimen, with a nave and chancel of earlier date; it was repaired and repewed in 1842, at an expense of £300: over the window of the tower is a statue, which apparently belonged to the original building. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and attached to the Hall is a Roman Catholic chapel. Property now producing an income of £80 per annum was bequeathed to the poor by Sir Marmaduke Constable in 1485, and by Peter Carlill in 1666. Near the Hill is a bed of gypsum, containing specimens of snake-stones; and in the rabbit warren of Follingham farm is a spring said to possess medicinal properties. The shock of an earthquake was felt here on the 18th of January, 1822; and also in 1843, soon after the great earthquake in the West Indies.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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