Hollington (St. Lawrence)

HOLLINGTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Battle, hundred of Baldslow, rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 2¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Hastings; containing 386 inhabitants. This parish, which is beautifully situated on the road from London to Hastings and St. Leonard's, is by some writers identified as the scene of the commencement of the battle between Harold, and William, Duke of Normandy. The soil is fertile, and the lands produce hops of good quality, to the culture of which about 60 acres are appropriated. Ironstone is abundant, and formerly there were furnaces for smelting the ore; limestone and freestone are quarried to a considerable extent, and the latter is of good quality for building. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8. 0. 2.; net income, £206; patrons, the Executors of the late C. G. Eversfield, Esq. The church, an ancient structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, is picturesquely situated in the midst of a wood, half a mile from any dwellinghouse. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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