Hinton-Charterhouse (St. John the Baptist)

HINTON-CHARTERHOUSE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bath, hundred of Wellow, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Bath; containing 797 inhabitants. This place is supposed to have been the site of a Roman station, and considerable vestiges of ancient buildings may yet be seen, with some remains of a small amphitheatre: in turning up the soil in various places Roman pottery has been found, from the coarsest kind to the finest Samian ware, with iron, glass, and scoriæ of iron; and the line of a Roman road may still be distinctly traced. A Carthusian monastery was founded here in 1227, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, St. John the Baptist, and All Saints, by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, widow of William Long Espee, who removed to it the monks of Heythorp, in the county of Gloucester, in 1232; it continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was £262. 12. The remains consist chiefly of the chapel, charnel-house, and granary, surrounded by a grove of aged oaks. The parish, which derives the affix to its name from the monastery, comprises about 3000 acres, rather more than one-half being arable; the surface is finely varied, and the substratum abounds with freestone of good quality for building, and with sandstone for repairing the roads. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of woollencloth. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of Norton St. Philip's. The church has been enlarged. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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