Hickling (St. Luke)

HICKLING (St. Luke), a parish, in the union, and S. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 8¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 581 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated within two miles of the road from Melton-Mowbray to Nottingham, comprises about 3000 acres: the soil in some parts is fertile, and in others indifferent in quality; the substratum is chiefly limestone, in which many fossils are imbedded. The Nottingham and Grantham canal passes close to the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 8. 4., and in the gift of Queen's College, Cambridge. On the division of the common, 490 acres of land were given in lieu of tithes; much of it is of inferior quality: the value of the whole is £400 per annum. The church is a handsome ancient structure, with a lofty tower: the lid of a stone coffin, curiously inscribed with Runic characters, has been discovered in the chancel. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The Roman Fosse-road from Lincoln passes through the parish; and in 1771, 200 coins of the reign of Vespasian were dug up on Standard Hill, so called from a standard formerly on it.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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