Heybridge (St. Andrew)

HEYBRIDGE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Thurstable, N. division of Essex, 1 mile (N. N. E.) from Maldon; containing 1177 inhabitants. This parish, which is about six miles in circumference, and is situated on the north bank of the river Blackwater, appears to have derived its present name from the construction of a bridge of five arches in the time of Henry VI. The old name was Tedwaldinton. The village, between which and Maldon is a raised causeway made prior to the reign of Edward II., stands pleasantly near the junction of the Blackwater and the Chelmer, and has greatly increased in trade, extent, and population, since the formation of the Chelmer navigation, by means of a canal to Chelmsford, which passes through the parish. Vessels of 250 tons' burthen are enabled to come up, drawing 14 feet of water; and at spring tides there are 16 feet of water at the lock. Extensive salt-works have been established by a company who laid out £20,000 in furtherance of that object; and there are also an iron-foundry and a plough manufactory. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £159; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The church is a small ancient edifice, situated on the strand opposite Maldon, and in high tides is washed by the sea. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z