Hevingham (St. Botolph)

HEVINGHAM (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Aylsham; containing 893 inhabitants. Hevingham formerly belonged to the bishops of Norwich, one of whom, Walter de Suffield, in 1250 built a palace here, no trace of which now remains. The parish is situated on the road from Norwich to Aylsham, and comprises 2845a. 2r. 21p., whereof about 1672 acres are arable, 444 pasture and meadow, 420 wood and plantation, and 300 heath. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 16., and in the gift of the Rev. W. J. Carver: the tithes have been commuted for £540, and the glebe contains 34 acres. The church is an ancient structure, chiefly in the early and decorated styles; it was originally cruciform, but has lost the northern portion of its transept, which supported a square embattled tower. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship. John Hall, in 1715, built a school, which he endowed with five acres of land.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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