Heslington (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HESLINGTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, union and E. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. E. by E.) from York; containing 266 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1200 acres of land. Heslington Hall, an ancient mansion in the Elizabethan style, is the residence of Major Nicholas Yarburgh, lord of the manor, whose family has long been seated here. The village, which is large and pleasant, is situated on the eastern side of the vale of the Ouse. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Archbishop of York; and has a net income of £63: the church is a small but neat edifice, with a tower at the west end. An almshouse for eight poor men and one woman was founded in 1608, by Sir Thomas Hesketh, who endowed it with a rent-charge, now £55 per annum, out of five corn-mills in the suburbs of York: the almshouse was re-erected by Henry Yarburgh, Esq., in 1795, in which year, also, a school, and a house for the master, were built by subscription. In a gravel-pit, about ten years since, two stone coffins, two glass urns, and several gold rings, bracelets, and other antiquities, were found, supposed to have been the incasement of a Danish prince.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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