Hemingbrough (St. Mary)

HEMINGBROUGH (St. Mary), a parish, partly in the union of Howden, and partly in that of Selby, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelries of Barlby, and Cliff with Lund, and the townships of Brackenholme with Woodhall, South Duffield, Menthorpe with Bowthorpe, and Osgodby, 1953 inhabitants, of whom 475 are in the township of Hemingbrough, 4¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Selby. The parish comprises about 9000 acres, of which fourfifths are arable land: the Hull and Selby railway passes through it, and at Cliff is a station, where coal and lime are unloaded for the convenience of the neighbourhood. The village, which is considerable, is situated on the north bank of the river Ouse. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £85; impropriators, the families of Wilson, Tweedy, and others. The church is a cruciform structure, principally in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a lofty octangular spire; it was made collegiate in 1426, and the revenue of the society, at the Dissolution, was valued at £84. 11. There is a chapel at Barlby, erected in 1777, by subscription; and at Hemingbrough, Cliff, and South Duffield are places of worship for dissenters. A school is endowed with £35 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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