Heanor (St. Mary)

HEANOR (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Basford, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby; containing, with the townships of Codnor-with-Loscoe and Shipley, and with Codnor-Park, extra-parochial, 6282 inhabitants, of whom 3058 are in the town of Heanor, 9 miles (N. E.) from Derby. This parish by measurement comprises 7000 acres, whereof 1500 are in the township of Heanor; it abounds with coal and ironstone, both worked extensively, the collieries alone affording employment to more than 2000 persons. The town is pleasantly situated upon an eminence, on the road from Derby to Mansfield. The principal articles of manufacture are silk and cotton goods, hosiery, and bobbinet lace, providing occupation to about 800 persons. The river Erewash passes along the eastern boundary of the parish: it is crossed by Langley bridge, near which a railway branches off, and extends to the coal-pits north of the town; and about a mile and a half from the town passes the Erewash-Valley railway. The market, on Wednesday, has been discontinued. Charles Lea H. Masters, Esq., is lord of the manor. Heanor Hall is the seat and property of John Ray, Esq. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown: the income, previously £111, arising from a glebe of 19 acres, and some land in the parish of Wirksworth allotted in lieu of tithes, was augmented in 1841 with £39 per annum from the fund raised by the suspension of canonries and prebends. The church is a very ancient edifice, with a lofty substantial tower, from which is an extensive view. Codnor and Loscoe, with Codnor-Park, have been formed into a church district. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Wesleyans, and Ranters. £5 per annum were left by Richard Smedley, of Risley, in 1744, for the education of colliers' children; and £7. 10. per annum by the Rev. Francis Gisborne, of Staveley, in 1818, for the benefit of the poor. William Howitt, the poet, was born here in 1792.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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