Headingley, with Burley

HEADINGLEY, with Burley, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Peter, liberty of the town of Leeds, but locally in the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. W.) from Leeds; containing 4768 inhabitants. This chapelry, which is on the road from Otley to Leeds, and bounded on the south by the river Aire, comprises by computation 3020 acres: the greater portion of the moorland was inclosed about the year 1765, and has been brought into profitable cultivation; the surface of the district is varied. The village is situated on an eminence, and consists of good houses and seats, inhabited by respectable families. Here are the Leeds Zoological and Botanical Gardens. Extensive quarries are worked of excellent freestone, known as millstone-grit, which is raised in huge blocks and sent to London and other distant places for public buildings. The manufacture of paper, for which there are two mills on the river, is carried on extensively; there is also a large bleaching establishment, and at Burley are mills for the woollen and stuff manufactures, in which many of the inhabitants are employed. The hamlet of Burley has various detached houses and pleasing villas: the air is salubrious, and the environs abound with fine scenery. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £250, with a good parsonage-house; patron, the Vicar of Leeds. The chapel, dedicated to St. Michael, is a handsome cruciform structure, in the later English style, with an embattled tower surmounted by a graceful spire, and was erected in 1838, on the site of the ancient chapel, at an expense of £2582, by subscription; the interior is well arranged, and contains 560 sittings. The great tithes have been commuted for £130. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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