Hayton (St. Martin)

HAYTON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Bielby, 485 inhabitants, of whom 212 are in the township of Hayton, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Pocklington. A very ancient mansion stood here, in which Charles I., when proceeding to demand possession of Hull, then occupied by the parliamentary forces under Sir John Hotham, was splendidly entertained by Sir Walter Rudston, who for his hospitality was created a baronet on the 16th of August, 1642. Sir Thomas, the third baronet, dying without issue, the title became extinct, and the estate devolved on his sister, from whom it has descended to its present owner. The township comprises 1850 acres, of which 1340 are arable, 500 pasture, and 10 woodland; the soil is a rich loam upon gravel, and the scenery around diversified and pleasing. The village is situated on an acclivity of the road between York and Hull, and through it runs a small rivulet; the Pocklington canal, which communicates with the river Ouse, terminates a mile and a half from it. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 0½.; patron, the Dean of York. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £326. 7. 9., and the vicarial for £80, exclusive of a payment of £26. 5. by Sir Charles Anderson, Bart., and there are 60 acres of vicarial glebe: in Bielby are 90 acres of glebe. The church, which stands on a bold eminence, is a handsome edifice, with a tower surmounted by a good spire, and contains some portions of ancient workmanship. At Bielby is a chapel of ease. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z