Hayfield

HAYFIELD, a chapelry, and the head of a union, in the parish of Glossop, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Chapel-en-le-Frith; comprising the townships of Brownside, Bugsworth, Chinley, and Hayfield; and containing 2711 inhabitants, of whom 1715 are in the township of Hayfield. This place is situated on the river Kinder, and among the lofty mountains of the High Peak: the village and neighbourhood are lighted with gas, under an act in 1836. The cotton manufacture is extensively carried on, and there are also calico-printing works and some paper-mills, together affording employment for about 600 persons; several coal-mines in the vicinity are in operation, and stone of good quality for building is quarried. The Peak canal passes through part of the chapelry. Fairs chiefly for cattle are held on the 12th of May, and are very numerously attended. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £96; patrons, the Freeholders; impropriator, the Duke of Norfolk. The chapel, a handsome structure in the later English style, was built in 1819, by subscription of the inhabitants, and contains a handsome monument, with a bust by Bacon, to the memory of Joseph Hague, Esq., who bequeathed £1000, the interest to be appropriated towards clothing 24 poor men and women. There are places of worship for Independents at Chinley, and for Methodists at Hayfield and Chinley. The free school, held in the ancient grammar school-house, was endowed in 1604, by John Hyde, with an annuity of £10; the income, with augmentations, amounts to £20. 6. The poor-law union of Hayfield comprises a considerable portion of the parish of Glossop, together with the chapelry of Distley, in the parish of Stockport, county of Chester; and contains 9516 inhabitants.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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