Haydor (St. Michael)

HAYDOR (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Grantham, partly in the wapentake of Aswardhurn, but chiefly in that of Winnibriggs and Threo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (E. N. E.) from Grantham; containing, with the chapelries of Culverthorpe and Kelby, and the hamlets of Aisby and Oseby, 647 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2794 acres; the soil is various, in some parts rich, and in others of inferior quality. There is a quarry of excellent freestone, which has been wrought for many years, and from which has been taken the stone for most of the churches and gentlemen's seats in the district. A pleasure-fair is held at Michaelmas, when races and other sports are celebrated. The living is a vicarage, with the chapelry of Kelby united, valued in the king's books at £12. 6. 10½.; patron and impropriator, J. A. Houblon, Esq. The tithes of the two places were commuted for land in 1802; the glebe lands comprise 500 acres, valued at £505 a year. The church is in the early, decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and contains some ancient monuments, and fine specimens of stained glass; also some beautiful monuments in white marble, by Rysbrach, to the Newton family. In a field not far from the church, are traces of a castle said to have belonged to Hugo de Bussey, sheriff of the county in the reign of Henry I.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z