Hawes

HAWES, a market-town and chapelry, in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 17¼ miles (W.) from Middleham and 251½ (N W. by N.) from London; containing 1611 inhabitants. This chapelry is pleasantly situated near a branch of the river Ure, and comprises by measurement 16,159 acres, the greater portion of which is good pasture and meadow, and a small quantity wood: there are some lofty ranges of wild moor, but in the dells and on the lower acclivities the land is inclosed and generally fertile. Limestone, and thin beds of coal, are found; and in the neighbourhood are some lead-mines, which are worked, but are not very productive. The town is extensive, and the houses, which are mostly built of stone, wear an appearance of neatness and respectability: a handsome stone bridge was erected in 1839, on the site of an ancient foot-bridge of wood. The principal articles of manufacture are knit hosiery, caps, &c., with some other kinds of woollen goods. A market is held on Tuesday, and is well attended by dealers in butter, cheese, and bacon; there are fairs on Whit-Tuesday and September 28th, and cattle-fairs every alternate Tuesday from the last Tuesday in February until Whitsuntide. At a short distance from the town is Hardraw Scarr or Force, a magnificent cascade, falling perpendicularly from a height of 102 feet; also Aisgill Force, Cotter Force, and other waterfalls, which, although not so magnificent as Hardraw Scarr, are yet well worthy of notice. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Landowners, with a net income of £130: the tithes have been commuted for £186, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, and there is a college glebe of upwards of 52 acres. The chapel is a low plain edifice. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, Sandemanians, and the Society of Friends; and a school, founded in 1764, is endowed with £18 per annum. About a quarter of a mile from the town, are evident vestiges of a small encampment, supposed to have been Roman.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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