Havering-Atte-Bower (St. John the Evangelist)

HAVERING-ATTE-BOWER (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the liberty of Havering-AtteBower, union of Romford, S. division of Essex, 3 miles (N.) from Romford; containing 427 inhabitants. This place was held in demesne by the Saxon kings, and was the favourite residence of Edward the Confessor, who built a palace here, which was visited by Henry VIII. and by Queen Elizabeth, and of which there are still some vestiges. The name is derived from a ring given to the Confessor by a pilgrim, according to a legendary tale, the particulars of which are recorded in bassorelievo on a screen which separates the chapel of Edward from the altar in Westminster Abbey. The parish comprises by computation 4290 acres; the scenery is beautiful, and the views embrace the Thames, with the shipping, and considerable portions of Kent and Surrey. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £75; patron, Charles Ellis Heaton, Esq. The church, supposed to have been the chapel attached to the ancient palace, was in 1836 thoroughly repaired, at an expense of nearly £500, voluntarily contributed by the inhabitants; a chancel was added, a gallery built, and a vestry formed: the font is very large, and of great antiquity.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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