Hartshorne (St. Peter)

HARTSHORNE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Burton-upon-Trent; containing in 1841, 1389 inhabitants. This manor, called in Domesday book Heorteshorne, then belonged to the family of Ferrers. The priory at Repton afterwards had lands, and a moiety of a park here. The Irelands held the manor in 1504; Sir William Compton died seised of it in 1528, and it was subsequently possessed by the Cantrells, and by the Cants, an heiress of whom brought it to John Murcot, Esq., about the close of the last century. The parish is on the Leicester and Derby road, and comprises 2700 acres, in about equal portions of arable and pasture, with some woodland: the surface is hilly and undulated; the soil various, including almost every kind except marl; and the scenery picturesque. There is a quarry, from which the stone was obtained for the erection of the church and rectory-house; and at Woodville, until lately called Wooden-Box, a hamlet part of which is in the parish, are extensive earthenware manufactories, and brick-yards. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 2. 1.; net income, £540; patrons, the Earl of Chesterfield, and W. Blake, Esq., the latter of whom has the next presentation. The tithes were commuted for land in 1765; the glebe altogether comprises 388 acres. The church is a neat edifice in the early English style, the body of which was rebuilt in 1835, at a cost of £1400: it contains a very handsome monument to Humphrey Dethick, Esq., by whom was endowed a school for boys. A girls' school is supported by subscription. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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