Hartshill

HARTSHILL, a hamlet, in the parish of Mancetter, Atherstone division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from Nuneaton; containing 1061 inhabitants. This place is intersected by the Coventry canal; the river Anker, celebrated by Drayton in his Polyolbion; and the roads from Atherstone and Coleshill to Nuneaton. It comprises 1463 acres, of which about 140 are fine spring woods. The soil is fertile, the air salubrious, and the hamlet commands a beautiful prospect over a richly cultivated tract of country, embracing the Peak hills in Derbyshire, and the high ground near Weedon, in Northamptonshire; not less than forty-five churches being visible. The chief proprietors are, Richard Jee, Esq., Charles Okeover, Esq., and Mr. Alkin. The manufacture of ribbons employs about 400 persons; but the principal part of the male inhabitants is occupied in agriculture, and in mines of manganese (now nearly exhausted) and stone-quarries. The manganese is beautifully crystallized and of superior quality, and the rocks of quartz are thought to afford some of the best materials in the kingdom for roads; ironstone and greenstone are abundant, and copper and sulphur, and various mineral substances interesting to the geologist, have been discovered. A church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was erected in 1844, at a cost of £2200, raised by subscription aided by a grant of £300 from the Incorporated Society, and one of £400 from the Diocesan Society; the stone was supplied gratuitously by Mr. Jee: the edifice is in the Norman style, and admirably situated for effect, and for the convenience of the population. There are places of worship for the Society of Friends, Independents, and Methodists; and a free school endowed with land producing about £60 per annum. At the utmost point of a ridge in the hamlet, commanding a fine view of Atherstone, are the ruins of a Norman castle, built by Hugh de Hardreshull about the year 1125, and the site of which is in a very perfect state. Connected with their station of Manduessedum at Mancetter, the Romans had their Campus Martius at this place, and their Castra Æstiva, or summer camp, which is still perfect, in the adjoining hamlet of Oldbury. This was the residence of the accomplished daughters of Sir Anthony Cook, one of the tutors of Edward VI.: Mildred became the wife of the great Lord Burleigh; Anne, of Sir Nicholas Bacon, lord keeper; Elizabeth, of Sir John Russell, son and heir of Francis, fourth earl of Bedford; and Katherine, of Sir Henry Killigrew. Drayton was born here in 1563; and not at Atherstone, as stated by Sir William Dugdale.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z