Hartington (St. Giles)

HARTINGTON (St. Giles), a parish, partly in the union of Bakewell, and partly in that of Chapel-Enle-Frith, hundred of Wirksworth, N. and S. divisions of the county of Derby, 10 miles (N. N. W.) from Ashborne; containing 2197 inhabitants. It is situated on the east side of the river Dove, which divides the county from Staffordshire; and comprises by admeasurement 21,791 acres: the surface is mountainous, the parish being near the Peak of Derbyshire. Limestone is abundant, and extensively converted into lime; there are also ironstone and lead, the latter of which, however, is now but little worked. The Cromford and High-Peak railway passes on the east. A market and a fair held here have been long disused; but fairs are held at Newnhaven, for cattle, sheep, and hardware, on the second Tues day in September, and October 30th: the latter is also a great pleasure-fair. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £149; patron, the Duke of Devonshire; impropriator, R. Bateman, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land at the time of the inclosure; the glebe contains 205 acres. The church is a fine cruciform structure. EarlSterndale, in the parish, forms a separate incumbency. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is supported. Hartington gives the title of Marquess to the Duke of Devonshire.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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