Harrington

HARRINGTON, a small sea-port and a parish, in the union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 2 miles (S.) from Workington; containing 1934 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 2153 acres, whereof about 1944 are arable and pasture, and 46 woodland. It comprehends the old village of Harrington and the new town, the latter of which, a thriving port, formerly termed Bella-port, is situated at the mouth of a stream called the Wyre, which falls into the Irish Sea. The harbour was considerably improved at the expense of the late J. C. Curwen, Esq., whose father constructed the first quay, from which period its trade has been gradually increasing. In 1760, not a single ship belonged to the port. There are now upwards of 40, averaging 122 tons each, which sail quite up to the town, loading and unloading before the houses, and chiefly employed in conveying coal to Ireland; and besides these, about 500 sloops annually take in lime, which is brought from the adjoining parish of Distington, for Scotland. Ironstone and fire-clay abound in the parish, and much of both was formerly exported to Scotland and Wales. The town consists of several streets; there are two shipwrights' yards, a rope-walk, and vitriol and copperas manufactories. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 7. 3½.; net income, £250; patron, H. C. Curwen, Esq. The church is a neat structure, upon an eminence a little westward from the old village. The Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists have each a place of worship; and a school-house has been erected.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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