Hardres, Upper (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HARDRES, UPPER (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (S.) from Canterbury; containing 339 inhabitants. This parish, which is almost the highest ground in the county, is situated on the line of the ancient Stane-street, and comprises 2041a. 20p. The surface is pleasingly varied, and about 600 acres are covered with wood, consisting of oak, beech, birch, ash, &c.; the soil is a heavy loam, resting on chalk, and in general fertile: about 18 acres are planted with hops. The village is on rising ground, commanding an extensive prospect. A new road has been made from Lower Hardres to the church, at the expense of the Rev. E. S. Lumsdaine. The living is a rectory, with that of Stelling annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 13. 1½., and in the gift of the Heirs of Lady Hardres, and the Rev. E. S. Lumsdaine: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £440, and the glebe contains about 46 acres. The church is principally in the early English style, and contains several monuments to the Hardres family. Elizabeth Denward, in 1785, gave a dwellinghouse, two schoolrooms, six acres of land, and £30 per annum, for the endowment of a school; in augmentation of which the late Richard Tillard, Esq., left £2000 three per cents. Mrs. Denward also bequeathed £52 for twelve blind persons, £25 for widows, and £18. 18. for bread to be distributed on alternate Sundays at the churches of Hardres and Stelling. The gates of Boulogne, which were presented by Henry VIII. to the knight of Hardres as a testimony of approbation for his accompanying the monarch to France, were about thirty years ago disposed of to a blacksmith by the last proprietor.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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