Hardham (St. Botolph)

HARDHAM (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Thakeham, hundred of Bury, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Petworth; containing 115 inhabitants. This place is distinguished as the site of a priory of Black canons founded, it is said, by Sir William Dawtrey, in the reign of Henry II., and dedicated to the Holy Cross or to St. George, and which, in the reign of Edward III., was so liberally endowed by Sir William Paynel, that on the grant of a new charter in the reign of Henry IV., he is cited as the founder. There are still some remains of the buildings, of which the chapel is the most entire. The parish is situated on the river Arun, by which it is bounded on the north, east, and south; and a branch of the river Rother, which here falls into the Arun, forms part of its western boundary. The Arun navigation is conducted under a hill in the parish, by a tunnel 400 yards in length. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 10.; net income, £66; patron, the Bishop of Chichester. The church is a venerable edifice in the early English style. Near the ruins of the priory are the remains of a Roman camp, occupying a quadrilateral area of 400 feet square, rounded at the angles.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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