Hanbury (St. James)

HANBURY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford; comprising the townships of Coton, Draycott-in-the-Clay, Fauld, Hanbury, Hanbury-Woodend, and Marchington-Woodlands, and the chapelries of Marchington and Newborough; the whole containing 2483 inhabitants, of whom 114 are in the township of Hanbury, 6¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Burton. This parish is very extensive, being upwards of five miles square. The living is a vicarage not in charge, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield: the tithes have been commuted for £862, of which £510 are paid to the bishop, and £352 to the vicar, who has also a glebe of 20 acres. The church, principally in the later English style, with a Norman font, was repewed, and the north aisle rebuilt, in 1824. Marchington and Newborough form separate incumbencies. A school is endowed with about £24 per annum, and there are several bequests for the poor. In the year 680, the Saxon princess, St. Werburgh, became abbess of a nunnery founded here by her brother Ethelred, King of Mercia: she was buried in this convent; but in 876 her remains were removed to Chester, where an elegant shrine was erected to her memory. No vestige of the nunnery is now visible.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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