Hampton-Lucy, or Bishop's-Hampton (St. Peter)

HAMPTON-LUCY, or Bishop's-Hampton (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Stratford-uponAvon, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Stratford, on the road to Warwick; containing 458 inhabitants. This place belonged to the Saxon bishops of Worcester, from whom it derived the former prefix to its name, as it now does its modern adjunct from the family of Lucy, its present proprietors. In the reign of Edward VI., John Dudley, Earl of Warwick, obtained the manor in exchange from Nicholas Heath, Bishop of Worcester, for certain lands in Worcestershire, and in the same reign parted with it to the king for lands lying in Oxfordshire and elsewhere. The earl again obtained possession of it by further exchange, and on his attainder it was granted by Queen Mary to the Lucys. Hampton-Lucy is pleasantly situated on the river Avon, over which an elegant cast-iron bridge of ancient character, with a raised causeway 1000 feet in length, was constructed in 1829, at the expense of the Rev. John Lucy, the incumbent. The parish comprises by admeasurement 2989 acres, all arable with the exception of 76 acres of wood, and some rich meadow lands near the Avon; the surface is undulated and well-wooded, chiefly with elm, and the soil is in general strong and fertile. Of the area of the parish, about 750 acres are in the hamlet of Ingon, which is contiguous to the lordships of Clopton and Welcombe, in the adjoining parish of Old Stratford. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £51. 6. 8.; net income, £1147; patron, George Lucy, Esq. The church was handsomely rebuilt in 1822-6, upon the old site, in the later English style, from funds left by the widow of a former rector, and considerably augmented by the present incumbent; it forms a great ornament to the neighbourhood, and has a magnificent east window of stained glass, inserted in 1837 by the rector, and representing the principal events in the life of the patron saint. A free grammar school was founded in 1635, by the Rev. Richard Hill, who endowed it with estates now producing about £120 per annum. The Rev. William Lucy, D. D., in 1723 gave £2000 for the foundation of four scholarships in St. Mary Magdalen's Hall, Oxford, for boys from the grammar school, but they being ineligible for want of classical instruction, the vacancies are filled up with scholars from other foundations.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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