Halton-Gill

HALTON-GILL, a chapelry, in the parish of Arncliffe, union of Settle, wapentake of Staincliffe West, W. riding of York, 11½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Settle; containing 90 inhabitants. This chapelry, which was formerly part of the neighbouring township of Litton, includes Upper and Nether Hesleden, and Foxup, and comprises 7176a. 3r. 28p., of which 5881 acres are meadow and pasture, 1200 common, and 8 woodland. The river Skirfare has its source about five miles above, in several mountain streams, which, uniting in one channel, flow through the vale here, and join the Wharfe. Small coal is dug in summer to burn lime. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Arncliffe, with a net income of £80; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford. The township is all abbey land, and is exempt from tithes when in the hands of owners; the tithes, subject to that exemption, have been commuted for £109. 18. The church is a neat edifice in the later English style, erected in 1626. At a place called the Giants' Graves, fenced by huge limestone pillars set upright, human bones have been found.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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