Halford, or Halford-Bridge (St. Mary)

HALFORD, or HALFORD-BRIDGE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Kington division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (N.) from Shipston; containing 422 inhabitants. This place is supposed to have had its name from a ford over the Stour, and was at first called Aldford, or Old Ford. It is noticed very early, as being in the possession of Henry de Newburgh, Earl of Warwick; and afterwards passed to the heirs of Andrew Giffard, Margery de Cantelupe, and others. The parish comprises 917 acres, and is bounded on the west by the river Stour, a tributary of the Avon. Stone of good quality for burning into lime, and for rough building purposes, is quarried. The village stands pleasantly on the road between Shipston and Warwick, and has a bridge over the Stour, an ancient structure. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 9. 9½.; net income, £186; patron, the Bishop of Worcester. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1774; the land comprises 178 acres. The church is of very early date.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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