Haggerston (St. Mary)

HAGGERSTON (St. Mary), a district parish, in the Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 1½ mile (N. E. by N.) from London. This place was formerly an inconsiderable hamlet in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, but, having become a populous suburb of the metropolis, was in 1830 made a district parish. Many new streets have been formed, consisting of neat ranges of houses of a moderate size; the parish is partially paved, is lighted with gas, and amply supplied with water. Among the larger of the various works on the banks of the Regent's canal, which passes through Haggerston, are those of the Imperial and Independent Gas-light and Coke Companies, the former of which was established in 1822, for lighting the eastern district of the metropolis, and the latter incorporated in 1829. The facility afforded by the canal has contributed greatly to increase the trade of the place: there are several chymical works on an extensive scale; manufactories for japanned leather, floor-cloth, and hearth-rugs; a manufactory for boneashes; and several lime-works, tile-kilns, dye-houses, and coal wharfs; affording employment to a considerable portion of the inhabitants.

The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £500; patron and appropriator, the Archdeacon of London. The church, erected in 1827, at an expense of £15,000, by the Parliamentary Commissioners, is a spacious structure, blending the early and decorated English styles, with a lofty embattled tower of singular design, destitute of relief in the lower part, and ornamented in the upper with crocketed pinnacles; at the western extremities of the aisles are octagonal turrets, with domed roofs surrounded by crocketed pinnacles rising from the angles. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. Six almshouses, for members of the Company of Goldsmiths, were founded in 1705, in Goldsmith-place, by Mr. Richard Morrell, who endowed them with an estate for their maintenance. Fourteen others, with a chapel in the centre, were erected in Kingsland-road, in 1713, by Sir Robert Geoffrey, Knt., for members of the Company of Ironmongers: on the south side of these are twelve more, founded by Mr. S. Harwar, citizen of London, of which six are for freemen of the Drapers' Company, and six for persons of the parish; and to the north of them, twelve for freemen of the Company of Frame-work Knitters or their widows, founded by Thomas Bourne, Esq., who gave £1000 for their erection, and £2000 for their endowment, to which additions have been made by other benefactors.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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