Haddon, Over and Nether

HADDON, OVER and NETHER, a township, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Bakewell; containing 238 inhabitants. It comprises 2801a. 2r. 12p., of which 1326a. 3r. 10p. are in Over Haddon, which has a romantic village, situated on an abrupt and lofty eminence, overlooking the vale of the river Lathkill: the soil is a good brown loam, on limestone. Nether Haddon forms the eastern side of the township, and is bounded by the river Derwent. Haddon Hall is an ancient baronial mansion, delightfully situated on a gentle eminence above the river Wye. It strikingly illustrates the rude magnificence of by-gone days: the venerable castellated towers rising above the woods produce a fine effect; and the whole building, being still in nearly a perfect state, is an object of general interest and curiosity. Sir Richard Vernon, of Haddon, was speaker of the parliament at Leicester in 1425; his son, of the same name, was the last person who held for life the office of constable of England. Sir Henry Vernon, grandson of the latter, was governor to Prince Arthur, son of Henry VIII., who is said to have resided with him at Haddon. The Haddon branch of the Vernons became extinct in 1565, by the death of Sir George Vernon, who, from the splendour of his retinue and his great hospitality, acquired the name of "King of the Peak." Dorothy, the younger of his co-heiresses, brought Haddon to Sir John Manners, second son of Thomas, first earl of Rutland, immediate ancestor of the Duke of Rutland; and the Hall was, at one time, alternately with Belvoir, the seat of the noble family of Manners. The tithes of the township were commuted for land and money payments in 1806.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z