Hackington (St. Stephen)

HACKINGTON (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union of Blean, hundred of Westgate, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 1 mile (N.) from Canterbury; containing 506 inhabitants. A portion of the parish is within the municipal boundaries of Canterbury, and the whole comprises 1984 acres, of which 542 are in wood. The living is a vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £5. 2. 3½., and in the gift of the Archdeacon of Canterbury: the tithes have been commuted for £620, and the glebe contains 2r. 11p. The church has been greatly improved, and a window of painted glass put up, by the Rev. John White, the incumbent: it contains a handsome monument to the memory of Sir Roger Manwood, who in 1592 gave the great tithes to the vicar, and endowed six tenements for aged people. In the churchyard, in 1187, Archbishop Baldwin began a chapel in honour of St. Stephen and St. Thomas of Canterbury, wherein he proposed to found a noble college for 40 secular priests, the king and all the suffragan bishops to have a prebend, each worth 40 marks a year; but the year after he had settled some canons at the place, the pope, at the instance of the monks at Christ Church, ordered the chapel to be levelled with the ground. The bishop erected a chapel in honour of St. Thomas à Becket at the foot of St. Thomas' hill.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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